Wildlife

Injured Red Tailed Hawk

I found, what i think is a red tailed hawk, on the side of the road. It was just sitting there with its head tracking, from trauma. It let me walk right up and pick it up, pretty sure it was hit by an automobile. I knew it was going to be real cold that night and could not leave it there on the side of the road so I took it home and put it in a black tub and covered it.
The next morning before work we checked it out and found no injuries other than a missing eye that had been gone for quite some time but healed up nicely.

Around 9am my wife took it from the box and put it on our fence post. He sat there all day, just looking around and preening, with the head still tracking from side to side. I had no bird of prey food on hand so i put some raw hamburger on the board next to the hawk, it wanted no part of it! Luckily later that day I saw a truck hit a marsh hen, so I picked it up and took it home to the hawk, it loved it as you can see in the pictures.

Red-tailed Hawks have extremely variable plumage, and some of this variation is regional. A Great Plains race called “Krider’s” hawk is pale, with a whitish head and washed-out pink in the tail.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Light-morph western birds tend to be more streaky on the underparts than eastern Red-tails; south Texas forms are darker above, without the dark belly band most other Red-tails have. Dark-morph birds can occur anywhere but are more common in western North America – particularly in Alaska and northwest Canada, where the all-dark “Harlan’s” race is common.

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The oldest known wild Red-tailed Hawk was at least 30 years, 8 months old when it was found in Michigan in 2011, the same state where it had been banded in 1981.

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1 Comment

  1. Mali
    February 8, 2019 at 5:13 pm — Reply

    What a great job! We must take care of our flora and fauna before it’s too late for all of us. Thanks for taking the time.

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